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Everyday Technology: Machines and the Making of India's Modernity

Author:
Arnold, David

ISBN:
978 0 226 26937 5
Format:
Paperback
Pages:
232
List price(s):
18.00 USD
12.50 GBP
14.90 EUR

Publication date:
20 March 2015

Short description: 

Showcases how small machines and consumer goods that originated in Europe and North America became objects of everyday use in India in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The author examines how such technologies became integral to fresh ways of thinking about class, race, and gender, as well as about the politics of colonial rule.

Full description: 

Everyday Technology is a pioneering account of how small machines and consumer goods that originated in Europe and North America became objects of everyday use in India in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Rather than investigate big technologies such as railways and irrigation projects, Arnold examines the assimilation and appropriation of bicycles, rice mills, sewing machines, and typewriters in India, and follows their impact on the ways in which people worked and travelled, the clothes they wore, and the kind of food they ate. But the effects of these machines were not limited to the daily rituals of Indian society, and Arnold demonstrates how such small-scale technologies became integral to new ways of thinking about class, race, and gender, as well as about the politics of colonial rule and Indian nationhood.

Biography: 

David Arnold is professor emeritus of Asian and global history in the Department of History at the University of Warwick. Among his numerous works are Science, Technology and Medicine in Colonial India; Gandhi; and The Tropics and the Traveling Gaze: India, Landscape, and Science, 1800-1856.

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